Evening Primrose Oil

Evening Primrose Information

 EPO is used to relieve PMS symptoms and some arthritis-related conditions, although there is not a lot of scientific evidence about using EPO for those conditions. The strongest evidence for EPO is for treating eczema. Evening primrose is a wildflower that grows throughout the U.S. Although Native Americans used the seeds for food and made poultices from the whole plant to heal bruises, evening primrose oil (EPO) has only recently been used as medicine. European settlers took the root back to England and Germany, where it was eaten as food. Evening primrose oil is found in the plant’s seeds and is high in the essential fatty acid gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). Essential fatty acids — such as omega-6, found in EPO, and omega-3, found in fish oil — are used as building blocks for a number of molecules in the body. Your body needs a balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids for good health. In addition to evening primrose oil, GLA is found in borage oil and black currant oil.

Plant Description:

A circle of leaves grows close to the ground around evening primrose stems after the first year it is planted. Flowers bloom after sunset, June through September, or on overcast days during the second year. The leaves grow on both sides of the stem at alternating levels. This monograph focuses on the seed from which the oil is extracted.

What’s It Made Of?:

Evening primrose oil is extracted from the seeds and prepared as medicine using a chemical called hexane. The seeds have up to 25% essential fatty acids including linoleic acid (LA) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). Both LA and GLA belong to the omega-6 family of fatty acids. The body needs a balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids (found in fish oil) to stay healthy. Most North Americans get too much omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. However, there are different types of omega-6 fatty acids. Some are more healthy, such as those found in evening primrose oil. Other sources of GLA include spirulina (a blue-green algae), borage, hemp, and black currant oils.

Medicinal Uses and Indications:

EPO is used mostly to relieve the itchiness causes by certain skin conditions, such as eczema and dermatitis. It is also used to ease breast tenderness from premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or other causes. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) Many women throughout the world take Evening primrose oil (EPO) to reduce symptoms of PMS, although there isn’ t any real scientific evidence that it works. In one review of 10 studies that used EPO to treat PMS, only two were well designed. Both of those studies found that EPO had no effect on PMS symptoms. Better studies are needed to know for sure. Eczema Eczema symptoms include redness and scaling in addition to itching. More than 30 human studies report the benefits of EPO for eczema and dermatitis. A study of 1,207 patients found that EPO helped relieve symptoms from skin conditions, including itching, crusting, edema (fluid, swelling), and redness. EPO can be used in children and adults with skin conditions. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) Although a few studies have found that people with RA who took EPO felt better, the studies were hampered by poor design and high drop-out rates. Also, there wasn’ t any evidence that taking EPO actually helped slow down the joint damage that happens with RA. Rheumatoid arthritis should be treated with conventional medications, to slow down or stop permanent joint damage. Raynaud’ s phenomenon One small study suggests that taking EPO may help reduce symptoms in some people with Raynaud’ s phenomenon. But the study found no difference in hand temperature between people who took EPO and those who took placebo. More studies are needed. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a nerve condition where people with diabetes have numbness, tingling, pain, burning, or lack of sensation in their feet and legs. Two studies have found that GLA may help reduce symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Breast pain Although there is not a lot of scientific evidence, Evening primrose oil (EPO) is widely used to treat breast pain (mastalgia) in a number of European countries. A few studies have found that EPO seemed to help, but they have not been well-designed studies. Other studies show no benefit. Menopausal symptoms Although EPO has gotten popular for treating hot flashes, there is no scientific evidence that it actually helps.

Many midwives suggest evening primrose oil for their pregnant patients, since this herb can help the cervix thin and dilate and prep it for labor. You can take evening primrose oil capsules, or rub the oil onto your cervix during the last weeks of pregnancy. You can even insert the capsules into your vagina. But be sure to talk to your practitioner before trying evening primrose oil — women with placenta previashould stay away from the herb. There are other herbs — like red raspberry leaf and black cohosh — that also can induce labor naturally. However, no studies have been done to establish their safety. In fact, reports have suggested that some may even cause harm to a fetus — so don’t use any herbs without getting the green light from your doctor or midwife first.

Available Forms:

EPO is available as an oil or in capsules. EPO products should be kept in the refrigerator and out of direct sunlight to prevent the oil from becoming rancid. Generally, high-quality oil will be certified as organic by a reputable third party, packaged in light-resistant containers, refrigerated, and marked with a freshness date. EPO should be standardized to contain 8% gamma-linolenic acid.

How to Take It:

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, contain components that can trigger side effects and that can interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, herbs should be taken with care, under the supervision of a health care provider qualified in the field of botanical medicine. Adult Take 2 – 8 grams of EPO daily, standardized to contain 8% GLA. Ask your health care provider to help you determine the right dose for you.

Precautions:

EPO is generally safe when used in recommended dosages. Reported side effects are rare and mild, and include nausea, stomach pain, and headache. Stomach pain and loose stools may mean that the dose is too high. Don’ t use omega-6 supplements, including GLA and EPO, if you have epilepsy or another seizure disorder because there have been reports of these supplements bringing on seizures. Don’ t take EPO if you have bleeding problems or a blood disorder. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should ask their doctors before taking EPO.

Risks

If you are currently being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use EPO without first talking to your health care provider. Blood-thinning medications (anticoagulants) – EPO may raise the risk of bleeding, especially if you take blood-thinners such as aspirin, warfarin (Coumadin), and clopidogrel (Plavix). Blood pressure medications – EPO may lower blood pressure in some people, although researchers aren’ t sure. If you take medications to treat high blood pressure, ask your doctor before taking EPO. Phenothizines – People who take a class of medications called phenothiazines to treat schizophrenia should not take EPO because it may increase the risk of seizures. Medications to control seizures – EPO may lower the threshold for seizures, so people who are prone to seizures should not take it. Antidepressants – It’ s possible, although researchers aren’ t sure, that EPO may interact with some antidepressants, including selective serotonin uptake inhibitors such as:

  • Citalopram (Celexa)
  • Escitalopram (Lexapro)
  • Fluoxetine (Prozac)
  • Paroxetine (Paxil)
  • Sertraline (Zoloft)

Alternative Names:

Oenothera biennis; Sun drop

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


× five = 30

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>