Essential Oil Directory

Essential oils are one of natures best kept secrets. Every new oil or blend of oils comes with a different experience, a testimonial or sometimes even a miracle! Oils are for reducing stress and anxiety, fighting flu, increasing concentration, managing pain, detoxifying my body, relaxing muscle spasms and for a good night sleep. Lavender can relieve stress at work, improve  concentration and reduce insomnia.Peppermint will cool skin during hot days, shrink my muscle pain, and ease nausea.

Allspice Berry
The oil has a warm, spicy-sweet aroma. It is used in spicy or masculine scents. It combines well with orange, ginger, patchouli and all of the spice oils including cinnamon, cassia and clove.
Aromatherapy benefits: warming, cheering, comforting, nurturing.

Amyris
Amyris is also known as West Indian sandalwood, although unrelated to the true Indian sandalwood. It has a woody, slightly sweet, balsamic aroma, suggestive of sandalwood. Amyris is used as a fragrance fixative-it slows the evaporation and dissipation of the fragrance it is added to. It blends well with cedarwood, jasmine and rose scents.
Aromatherapy benefits: strengthening, centering.

Anise
The oil of anise and star anise are often used and sold interchangeably because they are similar in aroma and chemical make-up. he primary constituent of both is anethole, a sweet substance that solidifies at room temperature. If this happens simply warm the bottle in a warm water bath until the oil liquefies.
Aromatherapy benefits: cheering, mildly euphoric.

Basil, Sweet
There are many types of basil: linalool basil, exotic basil and sweet basil. The odor of the linalool type is very green, floral-sweet and is most often used in expensive perfumes. The exotic type of basil is stronger with a hint of camphor. Frontier’s sweet basil type combines both qualities in a floral-spicy aroma with a lasting herbal sweetness. Clary sage, bergamot and lime oil work well with basil oil.
Aromatherapy benefits: clarifying, uplifting, energizing, refreshing.

Bay
Bay oil is distilled from the leaves and small twigs of the bay rum tree. It has a powerful, spicy, sweet aroma with a distinctive clove note. It is used to produce bay rum fragrance and as a component of fresh, spicy scents.
Aromatherapy benefits: clarifying, warming.

Bergamot
Bergamot oil is cold-pressed from the peel of the nearly ripe fruit. The aroma of bergamot oil is fresh, lively, fruity and sweet. It is an excellent deodorizer. It contains a constituent called bergaptene that increases the skin’s sensitivity to sunlight. Bergamot BF means “bergaptene free.” Most of the sensitizing bergaptene constituent has been distilled out of this product but traces may still remain.
Aromatherapy benefits: uplifting, inspiring, confidence-building.

Camphor, White
White is the grade preferred in scenting detergents, soaps, disinfectants, deodorants, room sprays and other household products.
Aromatherapy benefits: clarifying, energizing, purifying.

Cardamom Seed
The oil has a spicy, camphor-like aroma with floral undertones. It imparts a warm note to masculine scents and floral perfumes. It blends well with bergamot, frankincense, ylang ylang, cedarwood and coriander.
Aromatherapy benefits: warming, comforting, alluring.

Carrot Seed
This oil is distilled from the seed of the common carrot. Its aroma is dry-woody, somewhat sweet and earthy. In perfumery, carrot seed oil is appreciated for the interesting fatty-woody note it lends to Oriental, fantasy, and nature-type perfumes. It is an excellent addition to skin care oils.
Aromatherapy benefits: replenishing, nourishing, restoring.

Cassia Bark
Cassia, or Chinese cinnamon, is the spice sold as cinnamon in the United States. Ceylon cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) is considered the true cinnamon in most of the rest of the world. The two are similar in taste, though Ceylon cinnamon has a sweeter, more delicate flavor. The oils of both contain cinnamic aldehyde as the major component, with cassia having the larger amount. Caution: Cassia oil is very irritating to the skin and should be handled with care.
Aromatherapy benefits: comforting, energizing, warming.

Cedar, Atlas
The Atlas cedar grows in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco and Algeria. The aroma of Atlas cedar is woody, oily and slightly animal-like. The tree is closely related to the famous centuries-old biblical cedars of Lebanon now protected from further destruction by law. Atlas cedar is used for its aroma and fixative powers in soaps and perfumes. It blends well with woody, floral fragrances. Aromatherapy benefits: stabilizing, centering, strengthening. Cedarwood, Red - Red cedarwood essential oil actually comes from a type of juniper known as Juniperus virginiana, whose common name is eastern red cedar. The balsamic-woody aroma of cedarwood oil evokes a feeling of inner strength and centeredness. It is quite useful in times of emotional stress and anxiety to overcome feelings of powerlessness.


Chamomile, German
The oil of German chamomile is also known as blue chamomile. The color of the oil is deep blue, turning green then brown with age and exposure to light. The odor is sweet, tobacco-like and fruity, apple-like. It adds a warm, long-lasting, rich undertone in perfumes. Chamomile is a mild, soothing oil and is popular in massage blends and other herbal preparations.
Aromatherapy benefits: calming, relaxing, soothing.

Chamomile, Roman
Roman chamomile contains only trace amounts of the intense blue component azulene, which gives German chamomile its color. This oil is commonly used in perfumery. It blends well with bergamot, jasmine, neroli and clary sage, lending a warm, fresh note when added in small quantities. The aroma is not long-lasting like that of the German chamomile but it is a mild, soothing oil.
Aromatherapy benefits: relaxing, calming.

Chamomile, Wild
Wild or Moroccan chamomile is related to Roman chamomile. While the fragrance of these two are somewhat similar, wild chamomile is distinct enough to have earned its own place in perfumery. Wild chamomile has a fresh, herbal note and a rich, balsamic, sweet undertone which is very long-lasting. It blends well with woody fragrances like cypress, as well as citrus oils and musk scents like angelica.
Aromatherapy benefits: soothing, nurturing.

Cinnamon Bark
Also known as Ceylon cinnamon, this is the true cinnamon of world commerce. Its aroma is similar to cassia, or Chinese cinnamon. The aroma of Ceylon cinnamon is preferred to cassia for perfume where it gives a warm, floral-enhancing effect. Cinnamon oil blends well with oriental-woody notes and is often combined with frankincense. It is a skin irritant and should be handled with care.
Aromatherapy benefits: comforting, warming.

Cinnamon Leaf
Cinnamon leaf oil is distilled from the leaves of the same tree that produces cinnamon bark oil. The aroma is more reminiscent of cloves than cinnamon due to the large amount of eugenol in the oil. It is often used in Oriental fragrances. Use with care, cinnamon leaf can irritate the skin.
Aromatherapy benefits: refreshing, vitalizing.

Citronella
There are two types of citronella essential oil: the Java type and the Ceylon type. Aura Cacia offers both types of citronella — our Ceylon type is certified organic. While the grass that produces the Java type oil is grown in many parts of the tropical world, the Ceylon type is cultivated in Sri Lanka. The oils produced from the two types of grasses vary somewhat in composition and aroma. The odor of Ceylon citronella is fresh, grassy and warm-woody. It is preferred for scenting outdoor sprays, room sprays and household products. Java oil has a sweeter, more floral aroma which is preferred in perfumery.
Aromatherapy benefits: purifying, vitalizing.

Clary Sage
Clary sage oil has a spicy, hay-like, bittersweet aroma. It combines well with coriander, cardamom, citrus oils, sandalwood, cedarwood, geranium and lavandin. The aroma of clary sage is long-lasting and the oil is valued as a fixative for other scents.
Aromatherapy benefits: centering, euphoric, visualizing.

Clove Bud
The best clove oil is distilled from the whole dried flower buds of the clove tree. Inferior oils are distilled from the leaves and stems and are sometimes sold as clove oil without any designation of the source. Clove bud oil has a powerful, spicy-fruity, warm, sweet aroma. Clove oil is highly irritating to the skin and should be handled with caution.
Aromatherapy benefits: warming, comforting.

Coriander Seed
Coriander oil has a delightful fragrance: spicy, aromatic, pleasantly sweet, not unlike bergamot orange. It blends well with clary sage, bergamot, cinnamon bark, jasmine and frankincense for use in spicy, masculine perfumes or light, floral colognes.
Aromatherapy benefits: nurturing, supportive.

Cypress
The oil has a refreshing, spicy, juniper and pine needle-like aroma and is often used as a modifier in pine fragrances. It blends well with lavender, clary sage, citrus and Angelica.
Aromatherapy benefits: purifying, balancing.  

Eucalyptus
Of the 300 species of eucalyptus trees in the world, Eucalyptus globulus is the best known. Eucalyptus has long been used in topical preparations such as liniments and salves. Cineole is the major constituent.
Aromatherapy benefits: purifying, invigorating.

Fennel, Sweet
Sweet fennel oil has a very sweet, earthy, anise-like aroma due to its primary constituent, anethole. Sweet fennel usually contains more anethole than bitter fennel oil.
Aromatherapy benefits: nurturing, supportive, restorative.

Frankincense
Various species of frankincense trees grow wild throughout Western India, Northeastern Africa and Southern Saudi Arabia. The oil is distilled from the gum resin that oozes from incisions made in the bark of the trees. The oil is spicy, balsamic, green-lemon-like and peppery. It modifies the sweetness of citrus oils such as orange and bergamot. It is also the base for incense type perfumes and is important in Oriental, floral, spice and masculine scents.
Aromatherapy benefits: calming, visualizing, meditative.

Geranium (Bourbon)
This oil is one of the most important perfumery oils and is an important ingredient in all types of fragrances. It has a powerful, leafy-rose aroma with fruity, mint undertones. Bourbon oil, from the island of Reunion, is considered the finest grade, and has the best staying power. It is used in skin care products for both its fragrance and its toning, cleansing properties.
Aromatherapy benefits: soothing, mood-lifting, balancing.

Ginger
Ginger oil has a warm, spicy-woody odor. It blends well with spice and citrus oils.
Aromatherapy benefits: warming, strengthening, anchoring.

Grapefruit
It has a fresh, sweet, bitter, citrus aroma. It is used to scent citrus perfumes and colognes, soaps, creams and lotions.
Aromatherapy benefits: refreshing, cheering.

Hyssop
Historically, hyssop herb was regarded as a sacred plant and was used as a strewing herb and incense to purify holy places. The scent of the oil is reminiscent of the herb; spicy, sweet, woody and strong. It blends well with clove, lavender, rosemary, myrtle, sage, clary sage and citrus oils.
Aromatherapy benefits: refreshing, purifying.

Jasmine Absolute
The fragrance of jasmine is a component in so many perfumes that there is an old saying: “No perfume is complete without jasmine.” Artificial jasmine cannot begin to compete with the full, rich, honey-like sweetness of true jasmine, despite the efforts of the best perfume chemists in the world. Great expense goes into producing pure jasmine oil. The flowers must be hand-picked before dawn when the essence is at its peak, and large quantities are needed to produce small amounts of oil.
Aromatherapy benefits: calming, relaxing, sensual, romantic.

Juniper Berry
Juniper berry oil is distilled from the dried ripe berry of the juniper tree. Juniper berry oil has a fresh, warm, balsamic, woody-pine needle odor. It is used with citrus oils in room sprays and in masculine and outdoorsy perfumes, after shaves and spicy colognes. Aromatherapy benefits: supportive, restoring.

Lavandin
Lavandin is a hybrid plant, the result of a natural cross-pollination of true lavender and spike lavender. The oil has a woody, spicy-green, camphor aroma. It is used in herbaceous colognes and blends well with numerous other oils including cypress, geranium, citronella, clove, cinnamon leaf, pine, thyme and patchouli. The scent is not very tenacious and requires the addition of a fixative when it needs to last more than a few hours.
Aromatherapy benefits: balancing, clarifying, purifying.

Lavender
Lavender oil is used in baths, room sprays, toilet waters, perfumes, colognes, massage oils, sachets, salves, skin lotions and oils. It has a sweet, balsamic, floral aroma which combines well with many oils including citrus, clove, patchouli, rosemary, clary sage and pine.
Aromatherapy benefits: balancing, soothing, normalizing, calming, relaxing, healing.

Lavender Spike
The oil from the flowering plant has a fresh, eucalyptus-like aroma, somewhat like a combination of eucalyptus and lavender. It is used to scent room sprays, deodorants, soaps, disinfectants and insect repellents. It blends well with rosemary, lavandin, eucalyptus, lavender, rosewood, petitgrain and pine oils.
Aromatherapy benefits: purifying.

Lemon
Our lemon oil is cold-pressed, a much better oil than distilled. The scent is evocative of the fresh ripe peel. Lemon oil in the bath or in massage oils should be well diluted as it can cause skin irritation. Caution: avoid using the oil in body care products when going out into the sun as it can cause redness and burning of the skin.
Aromatherapy benefits: uplifting, refreshing, cheering.

Lemon Eucalyptus
The aroma of Eucalyptus citriodora is similar to the aroma of citronella. Both contain citronellal as a major component. Eucalyptus citriodora has a fresh, rosy, grass-like aroma. It blends well with eucalyptus globulus, moderating that oils somewhat medicinal aroma.
Aromatherapy benefits: purifying, invigorating.

Lemongrass
Lemongrass oil is distilled from a tropical grass native to Asia. It has a powerful, lemony, grassy aroma. It is used in insect repellents, room sprays, soaps and detergents. Aromatherapy benefits: vitalizing, cleansing.

Lime
Two types of lime oil are commonly sold: distilled and cold-pressed. Distilled oil is pale yellow or clear in color with a perfumey-fruity, limeade aroma. Pressed oil, which we offer, is yellowish to green in color, with a rich, fresh, lime peel aroma. While pressed lime oil is produced in smaller quantities and is more expensive than distilled lime oil, it is preferred in aromatherapy. Lime oil applied to the skin, may, in the presence of sunlight, cause a skin reaction.
Aromatherapy benefits: refreshing, cheering.

Marjoram, Sweet
Sweet marjoram is distilled from the leaves and flowering tops of the same plant that produces the culinary herb. The aroma of the oil is warm and spicy, with a hint of nutmeg. It is used in masculine, Oriental, and herbal-spicy perfumes and colognes. Wild marjoram, (see below) is often substituted for sweet marjoram, but the two are not interchangeable in aromatherapy.
Aromatherapy benefits: warming, balancing.

Marjoram, Wild - Wild marjoram oil is not a variety of marjoram but is actually distilled from a species of wild thyme which grows in Spain. The oil has a strong, sweet-spicy, eucalyptus fragrance and is used in small amounts in massage oils for its invigorating effect.
Aromatherapy benefits: purifying, clarifying.

Myrrh
Natural myrrh resin is one of the oldest known perfumery materials. The oil has a balsamic, warm and spicy aroma that blends well in Oriental, woody and forest-type perfumes. It is also used in ointments and other skin care products. Myrrh was used as incense and in embalming preparation in ancient Egypt.
Aromatherapy benefits: centering, visualizing, meditative.

Myrtle
Myrtle is an evergreen shrub that grows wild throughout the Mediterranean. The oil has a distinct, spicy, camphor-like aroma. The better oils exhibit a sweeter, fresher note. Myrtle oil is used to add a spicy, herbal component to outdoors and natural-type colognes. It blends well with bergamot, lavandin, lavender, rosemary, clary sage and lime oils.
Aromatherapy benefits: clarifying, cleansing.

Neroli
Oil of neroli is distilled from the flowers of the bitter orange tree. It has a very strong, refreshing, spicy, floral aroma and is one of the most widely used flower oils in perfumery. It is an ingredient in eau de cologne and blends well with citrus oils and floral oils. Neroli is also used in premium natural cosmetic preparations such as massage oils, skin creams and bath oils.
Aromatherapy benefits: calming, soothing, sensual.

Nutmeg
Nutmeg oil is distilled from whole, dried nutmegs that have been cut into small particles and pressed to remove the fixed oil, also known as nutmeg butter. The oil has the characteristic aromatic, volatile, oily-spicy fragrance of whole nutmegs. Nutmeg oil is a component in men’s fragrances and spicy perfumes.
Aromatherapy benefits: rejuvenating, uplifting, energizing.

Orange, Mandarin
Although the botanical differences between mandarin and tangerine are slight, the oils expressed from each differ in aroma and are not considered interchangeable in aromatherapy. The floral, neroli-like undertones of mandarin are evocative and sensual. Mandarin is used in combination with other citrus oils in colognes and fantasy-type perfumes. (See Tangerine.)
Aromatherapy benefits: uplifting, cheering, sensual.

Orange, Sweet
More sweet orange oil is produced than any other citrus oil. Two kinds of sweet orange oil are available: distilled or expressed. Distilled oil is a byproduct of juice making and has an inferior aroma. It is often used as an adulterant in expressed or pressed oil. Our oil is pressed from the peels of ripe, sweet oranges. It has a lively, fruity, sweet aroma. It is used to scent fruity and eau de cologne fragrances. All citrus oils are quick to deteriorate and should be stored in a cool, dry, dark area in full containers. Aromatherapy benefits: cheering, refreshing, uplifting.

Oregano
Oregano has a strong, herbaceous, green-camphoraceous, medicinal top note. The middle note is spicy, medicinal. The dry out is sweet-phenolic woody, bitter-sweet. Oregano essential oil is invigorating, purifying and uplifting.

Palmarosa
Palmarosa is distilled from a grass closely related to citronella and lemongrass. The oil has a floral-rose grassy scent. It is used extensively in perfumes and soaps to add or enhance a rose note. Palmarosa is a cleansing, astringent addition to skin care products such as bath and massage oils.
Aromatherapy benefits: refreshing.

Patchouli
Used in countless perfumes and fragrances, patchouli is noted for its long-lasting fragrance and fixative ability. It borders on the exotic and even the name patchouli evokes images of heady aromas, dark, rich colors, candlelight, incense and intrigue. The aroma is very intense; it can be described as earthy, rich, sweet, balsamic, woody and spicy. Patchouli oil is one of the few essential oils that improve with age. Aromatherapy benefits: romantic, soothing, sensual.

Peppermint
Peppermint has a powerful, sweet, menthol aroma which, when inhaled undiluted, can make the eyes water and the sinuses tingle.
Aromatherapy benefits: vitalizing, refreshing, cooling.

Peru Balsam
Peru balsam is collected from wild trees along the “Balsam Coast” of El Salvador. Peru balsam oil has a very sweet, balsamic, rich, vanilla-like aroma. It has outstanding staying power and is one of the best fixatives. It blends well with spicy, floral, Oriental and balsamic scents.
Aromatherapy benefits: anchoring, strengthening.

Pine
Pine oil is distilled from the twigs and needles of the Scotch pine that grows throughout much of Europe and Asia. It has a fresh, resinous, pine needle aroma. The oil is used to scent a number of household and personal care products such as room sprays, detergents, vaporizer liquids, cough and cold preparations and masculine perfumes. When used in skin care preparations, pine oil should always be well diluted as it can be irritating to sensitive skin.
Aromatherapy benefits: refreshing, invigorating.

Rose Absolute
This is an economical, high-quality alternative to distilled rose essential oils, (rose otto). Rose absolute works well for scenting purposes, but to experience full aromatherapy benefits, we recommend using rose otto. Rose absolute has a sweet, deep-rosy, long-lasting aroma. It is used in perfumes for both its scent and fixative qualities.
Aromatherapy benefits: romantic, uplifting.

Rose Otto
Rose oil is one of the oldest and best known of all the essential oils. The fragrance of rose is associated with love. It is warm, intense, immensely rich and rosy. It is used in perfumes to lend beauty and depth. A drop or two in a massage, facial or bath oil is luxurious and soothing. The oil is used in skin creams, powders and lotions. Aromatherapy benefits: romantic, supportive, gently uplifting.

Rosemary
Rosemary is known as the herb of remembrance. The plant produces an almost colorless essential oil with a strong, fresh, camphor aroma. It’s used in many citrus colognes, forest and Oriental perfumes, and eau de cologne. Rinses for dark hair often contain rosemary, as do room deodorants, household sprays, disinfectants and soaps. Aromatherapy benefits: clarifying, invigorating.

Rosewood
Rosewood, or bois de rose, is a tropical tree growing wild in the Amazon basin. It has a sweet-woody, floral-nutmeg aroma that finds extensive use in fantasy-type perfumes and colognes. It is also used to scent soaps, creams, lotions, bath oils and massage oils.
Aromatherapy benefits: gently strengthening, calming.

Sandalwood
Sandalwood oil has a sweet-woody, warm, balsamic aroma that improves with age. The essential oil blends wonderfully with most oils, especially rose, lavender, neroli and bergamot. Sandalwood oil is also an excellent cleansing, astringent addition to massage and facial oils, bath oils, aftershaves, lotions and creams.
Aromatherapy benefits: relaxing, centering, sensual.

Spearmint
Aromatherapists use spearmint to energize the mind and body. A few drops in bath water has a refreshing effect while a facial steam of spearmint oil helps cleanse and tighten pores.
Aromtherapy benefits: refreshing, cooling, vitalizing.

Spruce
Several species of evergreen conifer trees are used to produce this pleasant, balsamic, sweet, evergreen-scented essential oil. The oil is used as a fragrance for household products by itself or with other pine needle oils to produce a fresh pine scent. Applications include air fresheners, room sprays, disinfectants, detergents and soaps. It blends well with cedarwood, galbanum, rosemary and all pine needle oils. Aromatherapy benefits: clarifying, vitalizing.

Tangerine
Our tangerine oil is pressed from the peel of ripe fruit. It is an orange-colored oil with the vibrant fragrance of fresh tangerines. The oil is used in colognes and occasionally in perfumes.(See Mandarin Orange.)
Aromatherapy benefits: cheering, uplifting.

Tea Tree
The leaf of the tea, or ti, tree had a long history of use by the indigenous peoples of Australia before tea tree was “discovered” by the crew of the famous English explorer James Cook. The aroma of the oil is warm, spicy, medicinal and volatile. It is occasionally used to scent spicy colognes and aftershaves. It blends well with lavandin, rosemary and nutmeg oils. Aromatherapy benefits: cleansing, purifying, uplifting.
Thyme, Red - Red thyme oil is the natural essential oil produced from wild-growing thyme plants. It has an intense, sweet, herbal, spicy-medicinal aroma. Both red and white thyme are used to scent soaps, colognes and aftershaves. Caution: Thyme oil can be irritating to the skin and should be used cautiously.
Aromatherapy benefits: cleansing, purifying, energizing.

Thyme, White
White thyme starts out as red thyme oil that has been further refined and redistilled to remove the constituents that produce the red color. The aroma and action of white thyme oil are a bit milder than that of red thyme. Both are used to scent soaps, colognes and aftershaves. Caution: Thyme oil can be irritating to the skin and should be used cautiously.
Aromatherapy benefits: cleansing, purifying, energizing.

Vanilla
The aroma is lingering sweet balsamic.
Aromatherapy benefits: calming, comforting, balancing.

Vetiver
The aroma is rich, woody, earthy and sweet. It improves with age. Vetiver oil is used extensively in perfumery for its fixative effects as well as its fragrance.
Aromatherapy benefits: supportive, grounding.

Wintergreen
This oil was once an important perfumery and flavoring material, but has been replaced by less expensive and more reliable supplies of synthetic methyl salicylate. It is used in toothpaste and mouthwash
Aromatherapy benefits: refreshing, bracing, invigorating.

Ylang Ylang Extra
Ylang ylang oil is distilled from the early morning, fresh-picked flowers of the cananga tree. The distillation process is interrupted at various points and the oil accumulates is removed. The first oil to be drawn off is the highest quality and is graded “extra.” Ylang ylang extra has an intense floral, sweet, jasmine-like, almost narcotic aroma. Aromatherapy benefits: sensual, euphoric.

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